Aphorisms Galore!

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Aphorisms Galore! lets you Feed Your Wit by browsing, searching, submitting, discussing, and rating aphorisms and witty sayings by famous and not-so-famous people.

Welcome! The computer thought you might be interested in these aphorisms today, taking into account things like their recent popularities, their ratings, and how new they are to the collection:

tiny.ag/axybc0uz  ·   Fair (2972 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

With love and patience, nothing is impossible.

Daisaku Ikeda, in Success and Failure

tiny.ag/i5ba47dl  ·   Fair (478 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

It gets late early out there.

Yogi Berra, (on Yankee Stadium in the fall), in Work and Recreation

tiny.ag/ufko7fwv  ·   Fair (3086 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

I do not know myself and God forbid that I should.

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, in Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/1i8zitnu  ·   Fair (892 ratings)  ·  submitted 1998

I wish to have no connection with any ship that does not sail fast; for I intend to go in harms way.

John Paul Jones, in War and Peace

tiny.ag/cz34szjm  ·   Fair (1108 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

My sources are unreliable, but their information is fascinating.

Ashleigh Brilliant, Brilliant Thoughts (copyright info: www.ashleighbrilliant.com), in Science and Religion

tiny.ag/yamidgsg  ·   Fair (519 ratings)  ·  submitted 1999

Ignorance does not necesarilly mean one has a lack of wisdom, for a most ignorant person can be one with much wisdom. It's "live and learn" that creates wisdom.

Austin Holmes, in Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/6b9j37a4  ·   Fair (528 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Wise men don't need advice; fools don't take it.

Benjamin Franklin, in Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/vsuzg5uw  ·   Fair (542 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Being kissed by a man who didn't wax his moustache was like eating an egg without salt.

Rudyard Kipling, in Men and Women

tiny.ag/yio6tuyz  ·   Fair (986 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Deep Thoughts (paperback)

The face of a child can say it all, especially the mouth part of the face.

Jack Handey, Deep Thoughts, in Life and Death

tiny.ag/uvpjrb6x  ·   Fair (721 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Desperation is like stealing from the mafia: you stand a good chance of attracting the wrong attention.

Doug Horton, in Success and Failure

tiny.ag/hyedkhd2  ·   Fair (330 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

It is the province of knowledge to speak, and it is the privilege of wisdom to listen.

Oliver Wendell Holmes, in Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/soebrnq6  ·   Fair (286 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Never offend people with style when you can offend them with substance.

Sam Brown, (Washington Post, 1977), in Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/ct4xj6gg  ·   Fair (533 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not certain, and as far as they are certain, they do not refer to reality.

Albert Einstein, in Science and Religion

tiny.ag/bmdpgrs0  ·   Fair (1377 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Let's have some new clichés.

Samuel Goldwyn, in Art and Literature

tiny.ag/t6xaogci  ·   Fair (576 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

The opposite of a profound truth may well be another profound truth.

Niels Bohr, in Science and Religion

tiny.ag/qn3ryz0y  ·   Fair (408 ratings)  ·  submitted 1998

Freedom is not the right to live as we please, but the right to find how we ought to live in order to fulfill our potential.

Ralph Waldo Emerson, in Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/losztnwc  ·   Fair (499 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Imagination is more important than knowledge.

Albert Einstein, in Science and Religion and Wisdom and Ignorance

tiny.ag/64hrko9k  ·   Fair (1211 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

I have sworn upon the altar of God eternal hostility against every form of tyranny over the mind of man.

Thomas Jefferson, in Law and Politics

tiny.ag/tq4jumf6  ·   Fair (409 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

Happiness isn't something you experience; it's something you remember.

Oscar Levant, in Happiness and Misery

tiny.ag/npf5ywfi  ·   Fair (473 ratings)  ·  submitted 1997

He that would perfect his work must first sharpen his tools.

Confucius, in Work and Recreation